The Tomato Diaries: #1

February

The first tomato seeds have been sown. I chose these two only because the packets were already opened and there weren’t many seeds left in either, so it doesn’t really matter if they fail to germinate as I will sow more seeds in a couple of weeks.

There were enough Yellow Delight seeds for two cells – approximately 3-5 in each – but I lost track of the Gardener’s Delight seeds (distracted by hubbie asking if I wanted a coffee) so the right-hand module may contain either variety – or even none at all – so whatever grows will be a surprise.

March

Time to sow more tomato seeds, especially after I tidied and cleaned the Tiny Greehhouse on the 21st.

This time, I’m using new seeds, Tomato Rosella, a cordon cherry tomato with a dark skin, and Tomato Bloody Butcher, a medium tomato with a sweet dark flesh (just because I liked the name)

April

Moneymaker and Yellow Delight

May

Sadly, none of the new tomato varieties have germinated (Rosella and Butcher’s Blood), but the Gardener’s Delight and Yellow Delight have produced seedlings. At the start of May, they were approximately three inches tall, so well behind what other gardeners are reporting. There is no point in my investing in heated mats or electric propagators as I have no power supply in either the Potting Shed or the Tiny Greenhouse, though I could put them in the conservatory – if they use less power than the underfloor heating.

On Sunday (9 May) I potted them on into individual pots – one Yellow Delight (top left) and seven Gardener’s Delight.

After last year’s debacle when none of the tomatoes had germinated and I threw the compost onto the raised beds (only for several tomato plants to spring immediately into growth), I have, this year, emptied the remaining modules onto the top of a large pot of compost to see what happens.

If I decide to start again with the Rosella and Butcher’s Blood, I will place the failed seeds into a different large pot – just in case.

2 thoughts on “The Tomato Diaries: #1

  1. We are at about the same stage with our tomato seedlings. We have never sown them very early in the year because we have found we end up having tomatoes ready to eat at about the same time anyway – the later sowings lead to tomatoes as early as the early-sown seed.

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    1. I’ve just sown more of the heritage ones so fingers crossed they germinate this time. I think I get carried away when I see everyone busy sowing seeds early on, but what works for Cornwall or London doesn’t work here – so I must have more patience 😀

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