Six on Saturday: 6 November 2021

Against all expectations, I have scraped together a further Six on Saturday. Not taken this morning as I had my flu jab at 9am and have a two-hour OU Tutorial coming up in a few minutes time.

It’s a grey old day outside, without a hint of a breeze to move the clouds on but the sarracenia adds some colour. It’s still outside, though I should move it undercover, away from falling leaves.

It seems a shame to disturb this pot but if I want to keep the begonia and pinks for next year I’ll have to do something soon.

‘Autumn Joy’ continues to live up to her name, and there’s a double delight as the afternoon sun sits lower in the sky casting shadows on the wall. Ignore the tatty lavender in the front (and my other neighbour’s overgrown shrubs that she has now decided she can’t afford to have cut back).

The foliage on the Jerusalem artichokes finally succumbed to wind damage, so I chopped it off as the pots kept falling over. Now they are safe, and I have some woody stems to cut up and put in the compost bin. They need to dry out first though (and I’m running out of room).

The cotoneaster looks its best this time of year. I’ve yet to see birds eating the berries though. Apparently the berries are popular with blackbirds, thrushes and waxwings. We have plenty of the first two, but I’ve yet to see a waxwing in the flesh (should that be in the feather?), and the other two obviously have better things to eat at the moment. Now I come to think of it, there are fewer birds visiting the garden this year.

One of the small, but fast spreading campanulas. I like it in the front border; not so much when it invades the cracks in the wall of the front border. I pull it out by the handful and I’ve had the weedburner on it but I don’t want to resort to weedkiller, Then again, I don’t want to have to re-build the wall.

So that’s my lot for this week. Now to wrestle with technology as I try to remember how to actually log in to the online tutorial room. Fortunately we don’t need to set up cameras, just headphones with microphone on Mute!

Coffee first, I think.

In other news:

Following investigations for heart problems after chest pains at the end of August, I had a CT angiogram on 3 November at eleven o’clock and a telephone call later that afternoon to say all test are normal (for my age), with no sign of blockages or heart disease. I can stop using the GTN spray (not that I had) and stop taking the low-dose aspirin. This is a huge relief. But it was a wake-up call and in the two months since the initial diagnosis of angina, I have got back into the habit of walking every morning and eating healthier.

12 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: 6 November 2021

  1. I am envious of your sarracenia, are they tricky to grow? Hope waxwings find your cotoneaster, I’ve never seen one in real life either. Of course once they find the berries, you have to find the camera to share with us! Glad to hear good results for you. Have a great week.

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    1. Thank you. The sarracenia is a doddle. Prefers damp margins of a pond as it likes its feet in water. Supposed to be fairly tolerant of cold – the pitchers with turn brown anyway so are cut off in the spring. I use the moss raked up from my brother’s lawn as their potting mix and sit them in a deep saucer kept full of rainwater. Keep outside or in a cold greenhouse over winter as they need a period of dormancy. Keep watered but don’t let the water freeze. I usually go up a pot size each spring. Cut off the old pitchers, remove from pot, remove old moss, move into new pot/new moss (like sphagnum moss) and start all over again. Mine didn’t flower this year but maybe that’s normal. Don’t use a tall pot, a half-pot is better.

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  2. The campanula looks so pretty in the wall – such a pity that it could cause damage (btw a vinegar spray could do the trick if you want it out, that’s what I use for the tricky cracks in paving). Hope the cotoneaster brings the birds in, it looks great with all those berries.

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